Gallery

Meet Peter Gould

“Peter’s photography is as much about the spiritual as it is about the visual, offering no questions or answers but rather affording the viewer to simply being in that moment and that moment at first glance seems to curiously exist without time or consequence. This is the true beauty of Peter’s work where there is a present quietness about it that shares the essence of purpose of the art and architecture of the past through contemporary mediums, one of the quintessential markers of the true Muslim artist.”

Nur Shkembi, Curator, Islamic Museum Australia

Medina Arches

Medina Arches

Mecca - Kaaba Door

Mecca – Kaaba Door

Istanbul - Evening Mosque

Istanbul – Evening Mosque

Damascus - Zainab's Tomb

Damascus – Zainab’s Tomb

“Peter’s beautiful work is a welcome addition to the contemporary Islamic art scene, a mixture of deep faith and youthfulness that represents tangible modern interpretations of Islam’s everlasting beauty in mind & spirit.”

Juliana Rahim, Curator, Islamic Arts Museum, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Hajj

Hajj

Lego Kufic

Lego Kufic

Iqra Book Shelf

Iqra Book Shelf

Fanaa

Fanaa

Peter Gould embraced Islam in 2002.

But…he didn’t quit on his creativity…

Meet Peter Gould!

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Gallery

Loving the Doris Duke Shangri La exhibit in L.A.

Shangri La is the name of an Islamic-style mansion built by heiress Doris Duke near Diamond Head just outside Honolulu, Hawaii. It is now owned and operated by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art (DDFIA) which is currently showcasing its traveling exhibit Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery till December 28th. Organized by Donald Albrecht, curator of design for the Museum of the City of New York and Thomas Mellins, architectural historian, the exhibit explores the synthesis of 1930s modernist architecture, tropical landscape and Islamic art that Duke achieved at Shangri La. This is the first major exhibition about Shangri La to be shown outside Hawaii, taking the story of Duke’s transformative engagement with the Islamic world and her work at Shangri La to national audiences.

The exhibit features photographs by Tim Street-Porter, archival materials and a selection of more than 60 objects of Islamic art from the collection. The exhibition also includes new art work by seven past artists-in-residence, including Zakariya Amataya, Afruz Amighi, Shezad Dawood, Emre Hüner,Walid Raad, Shahzia Sikander and Mohamed Zakariya.

If you reside in or traveling to L.A., this is a must-see!

These photographs of the exhibit especially of the Mughal Garden remind me of the palace of Alhambra in the city of Granada, Spain, a visit I hold dearly to my heart and will never forget.

I’m so now tempted to make a trip to Morocco!!!

Mosaic Tile Panel Gateway

Mosaic Tile Panel Gateway

Closeup of the Mosaic Tile Panel Gateway

Closeup of the Mosaic Tile Panel Gateway

Foyer

Foyer

Custom-made Moroccan Ceiling of the Foyer

Custom-made Moroccan Ceiling of the Foyer

Pierced Metal Lamp

Pierced Metal Lamp in the Foyer

Damascus Room

The Damascus Room

Another view of The Damascus Room

Another view of The Damascus Room

The Ceiling of The Damascus Room

Ceiling of The Damascus Room

The Dining Room

The Dining Room

The Dining Room

The Dining Room

Dining Room Tent Panels

Dining Room Tent Panels

Syrian Room

Syrian Room

Syrian Room

Syrian Room

Small Syrian Room

Small Syrian Room

Large Syrian Room

Large Syrian Room

Entry way to Large Syrian Room

Entry Way to Large Syrian Room

Mughal Suite

Mughal Suite

Living Room

Living Room

Mihrab Room

Mihrab Room

Central Courtyard

Central Courtyard

Display of Art in the Central Courtyard

Display of Art in the Central Courtyard

Mosaic Tile Panel in the Central Courtyard

Mosaic Tile Panel in the Central Courtyard

Private Hall

Private Hall

Pool

Pool

Mughal Garden

Mughal Garden

Meet the First Woman To Design a Mosque

As a Muslim woman, I still have a hard time coming to terms with minimal female participation in Mosques (religious temples). In Pakistan where I spent my early childhood years, women hardly attended the mosque. It was the norm so no one questioned. When I moved to the States in my teen years, I was surprised and inspired to see my Christian, Jewish and Hindu female friends so heavily involved in their churches, synagogues and temples. I turned to encourage the same atmosphere in our mosques only to discover the bitter truth. It wasn’t that women were uninterested, it was because they were not encouraged or inspired. Take our mosques, for example. The praying room for men encompasses three-fourths of the area of the mosque. Women are squeezed in the back of the facility within the remaining one-fourth along with screaming children, stinking restrooms and heated kitchen facilities. How do you expect women to participate when mosques are not even designed to welcome them in the first place? Muslim men have debated and pushed back on the idea of female leadership in mosques. “Women can’t lead the jamaat (the prayer)”, “women can’t pray in the same room as men” (mind you, in the House of God i.e. Mecca, we all pray together and there is no such segregation). Besides, I have yet to find a verse in the Quran which supports their sexist judgments but why is it that Muslim men in mosques are so afraid of their female counterparts. Excuse me but women don’t wake up every day conspiring on how to outsmart their male counterparts. We just want to do our best, and you will realize that when we are given the independence to do so, we only flourish and complement you!

So here’s cheers to Zeynep Fadillioglu, a pioneer in her space, the first female to design a mosque proving that Muslim women too can add value to the sacred grounds. Her Sakirin mosque brings an element of modernism to Istanbul’s religious grounds.

Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul

Of course, she had to consult Islamic authorities throughout the construction of the spectacular building, but regardless of religion, every worship space shares a common quality: “Serenity,” she says, “I think when you step inside a mosque, like any other religious building, you leave everything to do with the outside world, outside the door.”

Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul

Fittingly, one of the most thoughtfully conceived features is the position and design of the women’s prayer area. Islamic tradition requires this space to be behind the men’s, and it is often smaller. Yet Fadillioglu’s design for this section is in one of the most striking areas in the dome, perched on the upper level, flooded with light. “But I also decided to make the balcony level one of the most beautiful areas, with the chandelier crystal droplets just in front, and where you can see the mihrab [an alcove pointing towards Mecca] from the best angle,” she explains.

Sakirin Mosque, Istanbul

via architizer

Gallery

What a $95 million penthouse can offer you!

432 Park Avenue – the newest New York residential skyline towering at 1,396 feet can offer you a 30,000 square feet apartment next year starting at $16 million. Designed by Rafael Viñoly, the tower took 3 years to construct and now stands in the center of Manhattan offering its future residents a full view of New York City. So if you have a solid bank account, this maybe your next haven!

I allowed my imagination to drift away for a thousand milliseconds wondering what would it take for me to ever afford a place like this. I need to have at least $1.5 million each month for rent which means given what I earn as of Monday, October 20th 2014, I need to work at least 17 more years and not eat, drink, bathe, breath or … practically … not have a life for the rest of my remaining happening years!

Ah! The perks of being rich and famous!!!

432 Park Avenue residential tower

432 Park Avenue residential tower

Window

Window

Master Bedroom

Master Bedroom

Master Bath

Master Bath

Master Bath

Master Bath

Living Room

Living Room

Living Room

Living Room

Living Room

Living Room

Kitchen

Kitchen

Dining Room

Dining Room

Dining Room

Dining Room

Breakfast Bar

Breakfast Bar

Could you imagine a home like this?

via boredpanda